N.B.Taylor & Co., Inc. Realtors



Posted by N.B.Taylor & Co., Inc. Realtors on 4/29/2019

Spring is approaching which means it's time to gather your cleaning supplies to get ready for spring cleaning. During this time you'll be cleaning areas in your home that you have overlooked in your day to day cleaning routine. Here are a few easily forgotten chores to add to your list this year.

Fridge

Take time this year to remove all the contents of your fridge and give your shelves a good scrub. Wipe the walls and shelving of your fridge to ensure your food is going back into a bacteria-free environment. Once you've cleaning the inside, take some time to move the refrigerator out of its designated spot and clean behind the refrigerator. Food and other items can easily get trapped behind the fridge and be quickly forgotten.

Drawers and Cabinets

Placing clean dishes in a dusty cabinet doesn't serve much of a purpose. Set aside some time to remove your dishes and kitchen tools from your cabinets and clean any dust that remains. While all of your items are out in the open, think about reorganizing your kitchen to operate more efficiently. For example, move the dishware next to the stove to make serving food more accessible. Also, organize drawers by using plastic containers to ensure nothing gets lost or misplaced.

Baseboards

Since baseboards sit near your floor, they effortlessly gather dirt and dust throughout the year. Start this big task by moving furniture into the center of each room as best as you can. Moving it all at once will make it easier to clean each room without having to stop each time something is blocking your way. Take advantage of this opportunity and also look for any places that may need a touch-up coat of paint. This attention is sure to make those normally out of sight baseboards stand out.

Vents, smoke detectors, light switches

Use this opportunity to clean areas that are utilized in your home every day. Clean dust buildup off of air vents to give your home a cleaner air supply. Disinfect light switches from any bacteria to ensure no sickness gets spread in the near future. Most importantly, be sure to check that your smoke detectors are in proper working order and are clean.

Pantry

Take some time to look through the contents of your pantry for stale and expired food items. It's simple to forget about an undesired packaged food you bought months ago. Once you remove the items off a shelf, wipe it clean of dust and food crumbs. Utilize this moment to organize the things in your pantry to prevent foods from going bad or being uneaten. You'll be surprised at how much room for new food purchases you'll have once it's clean and organized.

Spring cleaning doesn't always have to be something you put off. Set aside the weekend to complete these tasks quickly and effectively. Get the whole family involved by making a to-do list and assigning chores to each individual.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by N.B.Taylor & Co., Inc. Realtors on 8/1/2016

There's more to lawn care than just cutting, watering, and fertilizing your grass. Even if you do these things correctly, your lawn will still build up compacted soil and lawn thatch (the un-decomposed stems and roots that tend to accumulate near the top of the soil). One of the best ways to address these issues is by aerating your lawn. If you've come here because your grass isn't growing as fully as it could be, you're in the right place. Whether this is your first time aerating or if you want to brush up on the proper technique, read on to learn how, when, and why to aerate your lawn.

What is aerating?

To grow healthily, the roots of your grass need to reach deep into the soil. When too much thatch builds up or your soil becomes too compacted, grass has a hard time taking root. Furthermore it becomes difficult to plant new seed or to get nutrients down to the roots of your grass. One do-it-yourself solution to this problem is aeration. Motorized aeration machines plug clumps of compacted soil and pull them out of your yard, allowing water, seed, and fertilizer to enter the soil to grow new, healthy grass.

When should you aerate your lawn?

The best time for aeration is during or just before peak grass-growing season in the spring. Warm weather and a lot of rain and sunshine all will help your newly aerated lawn grow quickly.

Steps of aeration

Here are the steps you should take for aerating your lawn:
  1. The day before aeration rake your yard and clean up anything that might be in your grass (pet toys, garden hoses, etc.)
  2. Water your yard heavily to make the soil moist. If you own an aerator, you can wait until the day after heavy rainfall. If you're renting one, just make sure the soil is wet enough to soften and plug
  3. Use the aerator on your entire lawn, avoiding things like irrigation systems. Then make a second pass with the aerator
  4. You can leave the excavated plugs on your lawn to dry up and decompose
  5. Once aerated, spread compost or peat moss over the yard to prevent further soil compaction

Aeration tips

There are many myths about lawn aeration. Some people argue that you don't need to plug the soil, but rather just spiking the lawn will suffice. Unfortunately, spiking the lawn won't do much to break down thatch and might even further compact your soil (think walking on your lawn with baseball cleats on). Another myth involving aeration is that leaving grass clippings on your lawn will cause thatch to build up quickly. This is also false. Grass clippings are mostly water and will decompose, adding nitrogen to your soil. This could save you money on having to buy fertilizer often. Another tip that will help you maximize the benefit of aeration is to avoid cutting your grass too short. Grass cut under two inches could be damaged or die. After you aerate, let your grass grow a few inches before cutting it, allowing your grass roots to take firm hold.